Sub-clinical coccidiosis is always underestimated, as there are no clinical signs but it is responsible for poor growth rates especially at times of stress such as weaning and transportation.

Sub-clinical coccidiosis is always underestimated, as there are no clinical signs but it is responsible for poor growth rates especially at times of stress such as weaning and transportation.

Sub-clinical coccidiosis:

  • The silent multiplication of coccidia without diarrhoea
  • Food absorption is reduced
  • Growth rates decline
  • Feed conversion rates are compromised
  • A reduced resistance to infections (coccidia decrease immunity)
  • Animals look in poor condition

Decoquinate:

  • A non antibiotic synthetic molecule
  • Active on certain protozoa: coccidia, toxoplasma, cryptosporidia and neospora for prevention
  • Without toxicity
  • Zero withdrawal period
  • Proven efficacy in controlling clinical and sub-clinical coccidiosis
  • Improving growth / feed efficiency by controlling coccidia
  • Highly effective against coccidia with no resistance problems
  • As a preventative it acts from the beginning of the oocyst cycle all along the length of the small intestine

Four field trials, carried out by the manufacturers, included two with intensively reared lambs, one on ewe lambs bred for milk production and one on fattening Charolais bulls.

The first two trials, one of which was carried out on a farm where no case of clinical coccidiosis had been detected, concluded that even when there were no previous signs of coccidiosis growth rates could be improved by feeding Decoquinate to the lambs.

In both trials the number of oocysts shed were dramatically reduced across the lambs being fed the supplement, daily liveweight gains improved because food conversion rates were better as there was better absorption through the undamaged gut wall. As a result the lambs were reported to have a better 'bloom'.

These two trials were finished after different lengths of time but both showed weight increases in the Decoquinate fed groups. One which finished at 84 days showed up to + 2.2kg difference and the second, which finished after 168 days showed a 5.3kg increase.

The third trial, on ewe lambs reared for milking, concluded in similar results. The ewe lambs were to be tupped at 7-8 months of age so needed unrestricted growth rates and the use of Decoquinate helped to achieve these goals.

The conversion rates, measuring the dietary efficacy were slightly increased between 15 and 30 days but between 30 and 75 days, they were clearly improved (+14%). At first lactation, milk production was greater than that of the control group.

The fourth trial involved Charolais bulls being fattened. The bulls were treated for 28 days after they were taken in the fattening unit at 8-10 months old.

The total weight gain after the Decoquinate treatment was 39kg for the Decoquinate group and 34.3kg for the control group.

The feed conversion rate was, for the duration of the treatment (28 days), 6.89 for the Decoquinate group and 7.39 for the control group and 5.35 and 5.51 respectively for the whole period.

It was noted that the Decoquinate group ate the daily ration more quickly and the animals had a better appearance.

The conclusion was that it confirmed that a 28-day Decoquinate treatment improves both the technical performance and health in animals entering fattening units even when they were only excreting a small number of coccidial oocysts.